I’d love to know what the open rates and click-through rates were on this Warby Parker email, because their email subject and call to action were razor sharp.

Even better? They’re ultra-simple (and easy to copy).

Yesterday I received an email with the subject #first and a warning to “keep this a secret for 24 hours.”

Warby Parker email subject "first - Keep this a secret for 24 hours"

Did I open it? Of course I did.

The email announces one thing: a new, “never-before seen” Warby Parker eyeglass frame design.

Warby Parker email body: "Tomorrow we're launching a new collection that features a never-before-seen frame construction. What's more exciting: we want you to be the first to shop it. Here's a little taste."

Did I click through? Of course I did.

And here’s the twist: I just bought new Warby Parker frames last month. I’m not even in the market for a new pair of glasses. And yet, even though I could have deleted this email with impunity, the email subject made me curious enough to open it, read it, click through, and tell you about it.

Why?

Because the email kept creating questions that made me want to find out the answers.

That’s it.

There’s nothing else to see and not much else to click. The pitch is all there is. So either you’re curious or you’re not.

But with hooks like that, who wouldn’t be?

Now, the real question:

Does This Tactic Convert to Sales?

Warby Parker Webster Frames

Soon to be the hottest style at your artisanal cat yoga café

Well, in my case, no. (At least not today.)

However.

By positioning their new frames as a buzzworthy event (“never-before seen”), I’m willing to bet that the curiosity they pique today and the style in which they did it will keep them top-of-mind the next time their customers need a new pair of glasses.

(By the way, the whole Warby Parker email marketing sequence is pretty effective, as explained by Rejoiner.)

So, the next time you need to send a sales email (or, hell, any email at all), stop and ask yourself:

What question can I ask, what curiosity can I pique, or what promise can I make in my email subject line that will excite my email list enough to generate a flurry of opens?

Then just make sure your email itself delivers a worthwhile payoff.

If You Like This Post

… then you may also like this post about the mistake that most people make when starting a new business, or this post about why you’re having trouble selling (and how you can fix it).

4 Reasons Why People Aren’t Buying from You (and How to Fix It)

 

 


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